We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.
"Little Gidding"
T S Eliot

Saturday, 1 July 2017

Wave power ...

I'm still playing with Powertex, and I found an offcut of MDF in my cupboard, which I thought I would use as a base. In preparation, I roughly cut some strips from an old T-shirt and some flower shapes from calico.

I coated the MDF with black gesso, and put some plasterboard tape down one side for texture.

I poured on ivory Powertex and spread it around before dunking the fabric bits into the ivory Powertex, and creating the flowers. I added  sand and small balls (also by Powertex) to add weight at the bottom.

I let it dry before using some bister sprays. I also added crushed glass to the centre of the flowers and a little gilding wax; although the photo doesn't really show the glimmery bits!

The measure of a man is what he does with power(tex)
With apologies to Plato

Took a trip to the British Museum last week and saw "Hokusai beyond the Great Wave" exhibition (on until 13 August). I love these kinds of exhibitions because they bring together artwork from around the world, which normally I wouldn't get to see.

Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) is mostly know for his Great Wave (woodcut) - have you noticed the boats and the people?

I also love the way he did waterfalls ...

... and this one with carp.

In fact water features a lot in both his woodcuts and paintings, as well as Mount Fuji.

This is an ink painting I wouldn't mind hanging on my wall - The Dragon of Smoke Escaping from Mount Fuji.

I've always had a passion for dragons - probably because I was born in the year of the dragon!

Usually our art trips start with a coffee and almond croissant, and this one was no different! Perfect day.


  1. I followed closely how you created your Powertex piece. It is beautiful. Laughed at the play on Plato. It was perfect, because you have mastered Powertex.

    I enjoyed the beautiful art you shared from the British Museum. Your photos of Katsushika Hokusai's art is gorgeous. However, I think you may have confused his dates, since that would make him 189 when he died. I know Japanese are famous for their longevity, but . . . .(grin)

    1. Oops - a slip of the finger there - now corrected. Thanks Elizabeth!